Talk:Speedcore

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Untitled[edit]

You guys have the BPM's wrong. Speedcore genericyl resides around 240bpm witch 16th notes are the reason why it sounds so fast. Actually setting tempo markers to lets say 1000bpm is really messy and hard to work with. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.2.224.93 (talk) 08:43, 2 May 2013 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Are "Max 300" and "Paranoia Survivor Max" from Dance Dance Revolution speedcore? --Damian Yerrick 22:54, 19 Nov 2004 (UTC)

I'd say no. Most, if not all, speedcore tracks would offend or annoy most listeners due to harsh elements in the track. Hence why I mentioned it has similarities to noise music. If a speedcore track of my choosing were to be played on DDR then there would be noone watching. :)
To be honest I don't know the tracks you speak of personally, but I imagine it would be more closely related to Hi-NRG or something a bit broader. Airconditioning 02:41, Nov 29, 2004 (UTC)
While game music doesn't usually deserve proper classification, and sometimes is very hard to classify due to the fact that artists don't conform to the same bounds that most conventional artists do, while Konami refers to MAX300 as Techno, and Paranoia Survivor MAX as rave (I think), the former would probably be best described as (rather offensive) sped-up tribal techno and the latter would probably fit under sped-up (more than double speed) hard trance with elements of drum & bass thrown in for effect. Both tracks lack a conventional beat (never mind the fact that MAX300 is actually 150 BPM) and thus cannot conform properly to normal specifications.

BPM rated too high[edit]

Starting the range at 300 BPM leaves out a huge community of musicians in Japan (and supposedly parts of Europe, but I can't vouch) that call themselves Speedcore (and rightfully so). There's a reason it's called 'speedcore' and not 'really fast music'; it could be said that it's part of the same 'musical species' as hardcore, breakcore, etc. That being said a better definition of speedcore would be fast hardcore, or fast gabber, but this is generalizing. Basically I believe the lower bracket starts at about 180/190 BPM, but that really would be 'fast hardcore' so 200 is reasonable. Speedcore is largely shunned as being 'non-musical' but there's loads of musical speedcore in Japan and it rarely approaches 300 BPM, but nobody would call it anything but speedcore, or at least 'super gabber'. The unique style is unmistakeable; massive overuse of samples and stabs, it's definitely not hardcore. It may be a bit 'goofier' than European speedcore but I feel it deserves a mention. See DJ Sharpnel/Speedfreak. freshgavin 2005 07 15 Yep, and just to add to that; 300 bpm is how fast the stepchart/arrows goes not the actual music.

Artists external links[edit]

I've culled the list down to two, where those two artists actually have articles. Before it was nothing but a linkfarm of non-notable artists. If they're notable, they should have articles, and not be simple self-promotional links. Perhaps the same could be applied to the record labels, unless a few without articles really are notable, but I won't do it because I don't know about it. --Dane ~nya 13:41, 23 February 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Going to do the same. If they don't have articles, they can't really claim notability can they? Blackmetalbaz (talk) 14:05, 30 April 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Remove Links[edit]

Links to extratone and splittercore (more subgenres of subgenres....great) redirect. The article itself makes no mention of these freak genres. Let us remove them entirely. -Gates —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.71.61.151 (talk) 00:50, 11 January 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Other Genres[edit]

Can we encorperate other genres into this article, like Lolicore?

If you can find legitimate sources for it, then go ahead. Though I like lolicore myself, I've only seen reference to it on Last.fm, and I find anything there rather suspect as they both allow user editing and don't require enforce citations. – mpdimitroff (talk) 16:39, 8 July 2009 (UTC) – edit 07:19, 24 July 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]
P.S. Don't forget to sign your talk posts with four tildes:
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Complete Bollocks[edit]

  • um, 50hz (3000bpm) is about the lowest tone that can be heard, therefore music faster than this will be indistinguishable from a hum. why is this article allowed to exist unchallenged? --81.158.252.50 (talk) 21:13, 23 April 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]
   The bmp is in reference to the speed of the music, not the tone.  —Preceding unsigned comment added by 88AdolfLover88 (talkcontribs) 05:56, 10 May 2010 (UTC)Reply[reply] 
Tracks with a speed as high as 3000 BPM would be referred to as "extratone" because even though the sound is created by a really fast (digital) drumbeat, it's perceived as a tone or a hum to the listener. Jiiimbooh (talk) 04:52, 26 May 2012 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Check these sites[edit]

http://www.discogs.com/

http://ush.net/board/index.php

Those are just 2 sites. Speedcore is anything from 250 to maybe 300 bpm. Terrorcore/splittercore/horrorcore is anything above 300 bpm. Anyone from North Radical Technology would have been able to tell you that. I will give you a week to change it before i edit it all and start from scratch Pineappletree50 (talk) 22:34, 21 September 2011 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Advertising[edit]

The job of an encyclopedia is to give out facts about its subjects. This article doesn't seems, to me, somewhat biased in this respect. In my honest opinion, the mentions about Roland products being "the choice of many producer" is completely unnecessary and deserves to be removed as soon as possible. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.93.2.114 (talk) 21:35, 19 December 2013 (UTC)Reply[reply]

and it s also wrong. very few producers used roland synths... RotelloItalia (talk) 12:32, 19 April 2018 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Agree about removing Roland[edit]

.. Speedcore is almost dead now (2016) and has been like that for almost 10 years now. If I ve to advertise something i ll do it for Trackers (FT2 above them all) or Renoise... but I don't know how many speedcore producers own a roland (and i know many of them) — Preceding unsigned comment added by RotelloItalia (talkcontribs) 04:39, 9 February 2016 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Speedcore Update[edit]

(2018) I am new to wikipedia so excuse me if I get anything wrong here. Anyways, I am a Speedcore producer and have been producing this genre of music for 2 and half years. I follow the community a lot and I plan on editing this page and adding more sources later on. As the people above said I do not believe that the Roland is relevant to the article. Most producers these days are using computers and midis to produce their songs. Very few musicians own Rolands. As for the BPM discussion. Early years of speedcore had different definitions. However, today Speedcore is defined as being from 300BPM to 999BPM with Splittercore being a subgenre of Speedcore at 600-999BPMs. Extratone starts at 1000 BPM even though a tone is not created until much higher BPM like 2000-3000BPM. Terrorcore is often said to be between 200-299 BPM. I have personally created songs that are above 300 BPM. It is possible. I also know much about the history of Speedcore and it's origins. I will write about this when I have gathered more information. I would also like to say that Speedcore is not dead. You just have to know where to look. There is many netlabels available today that produce this genre. Some other subgenres of Speedcore include but are not limited to: Flashcore, Lolicore, Splittercore, Dancecore. Cybergrind should be noticed for having some crossing over with Speedcore.

CatSpat (talk) 14:33, 4 April 2018 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Edited Notable Related Events[edit]

I think that the world "concert" is wrong in this context: imho party and event are better (but english is not my first language)

RotelloItalia (talk) 12:30, 19 April 2018 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Regional Scenes[edit]

Perhaps concert is the wrong word. Party is a good word or live performance. I am not sure how to cite the regional scenes. I know according to discogs that those countries are producing a lot of the speedcore releases. There are quite a few live performances in Netherlands and Germany. Does anyone have some sources to say that these countries are regional scenes?

CatSpat (talk) 17:57, 19 April 2018 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Broken link?[edit]

Is it intended that the link for m1dy redirects to the Japanese wikipedia? 2.247.252.124 (talk) 11:40, 1 January 2019 (UTC)Reply[reply]